Exchange ActiveSync folder mapping

A long time ago Jim Martin wrote an excellent article how Exchange maps folder IDs for ActiveSync:

https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/tips_from_the_inside/2013/06/17/activesync-mapping-a-collection-id-to-a-mailbox-folder/

MVP Glen Scales wrote a script, which uses Exchange Web Service, to query a mailbox and export the information into a CSV file. Glen’s post could be found here.

Lately I had to troubleshoot Exchange ActiveSync devices and had also the need of mapping IDs to folder as the IIS logs contain only the folder IDs. Glen’s script was doing a good job, but wasn’t too user-friendly. Therefore I improved the usability and extended the ability of gathering data.

With this I was able to easily troubleshoot my devices by parsing the IIS logs with my script Get-IISStats.ps1 and the new one: Get-EASFolderMapping.ps1

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Fiddler the allrounder for troubleshooting

In my Ignite session with fellow MVP Andrew Higginbotham Troubleshooting Complex Exchange operational issues, I mentioned Fiddler as a perfect tool for troubleshooting also Exchange ActiveSync clients as well as Exchange servers itself.

After this session a lot of people reached out to me and asked me about how to do this. So I thought a write-up would be a good idea.

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Get-IISStats: Updated version available

Over the last months a lot of changes needed to be addressed. The script was intended to extract data from the IIS logs. With PowerShell in combination with LogParser it did a great job. But different versions of Exchange, changed infrastructure and multiple versions of Exchange ActiveSync protocol demanded an update to fulfill these needs.

The latest version focused on code improvement and added support for the new version of Exchange ActiveSync protocol v16.1 .

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Exchange Active Sync settings command, PrimarySmtpAddress and Autodiscover web.config

I don’t know if a lot of people run into those issues described in KB3011892 and KB3012580, which ends in confusion by end-users and maybe a high volume of tickets for your helpdesk.

Note: This affects Exchange 2010 and Exchange 2013!

How does it looks like? Well, first it looks okay when you provide all needed information

EAS_PrimarySMTP01

but then it looks like this(have a look at the “Description”)

EAS_PrimarySMTP02

Okay, “123@local.com” is not really my PrimarySmtpAddress…but there are good news:

This is now fixed in Exchange 2010 SP3 RU9 and Exchange 2013 CU8, but therefore another thing is broken….

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